Colloquia en conferenties

  • Woe
    22
    Apr
    2020
    19:30Het Pand, Onderbergen 1

    Catriona Kelly (University of Oxford)

    Catriona Kelly is Professor of Russian at the University of Oxford and a Fellow of New College. She has published many books and articles on Russian history and culture, including St. Petersburg: Shadows of the Past (Yale University Press, 2014), which was shortlisted for the Pushkin Russian Book Prize. She is currently completing Soviet Art House, a study of the Lenfilm studio from the early 1960s to the 1980s.

    Soviet cinema is universally regarded as one of the world's great film traditions, but it is mainly the movies from the 1920s and the 1930s that are familiar to Western audiences. By and large, too, we know film history in terms of famous directors (from Eisenstein to Tarkovsky), but have little awareness of the studio culture that shaped film production. Catriona Kelly's lecture, based on extensive work with Soviet archives and oral history, uses the history of one of the USSR's most important studios, Lenfilm in Leningrad, to explore how studios as well as film artists had their own 'handwriting'. Rather than simply making up a further line of bureaucratic obstruction, they provided film artists with material and psychological support, and were highly individual and in some respects successful working environments for a variety of artists, including set painters and costume designers as well as the famous names at the top of the credits. The lecture gives particular attention to the ways in which Lenfil'm nurtured (while also sometimes coercing and even bullying) young filmmakers in the Khrushchev and Brezhnev eras, a period at which the radical expansion of the film industry led to a mass recruitment drive and brought in new generations of young people whose views and ambitions were often very different from those of the established 'masters' who had dominated movie production in the Stalin era.

  • Woe
    18
    Mar
    2020
    19:30Het Pand, Onderbergen 1

    Cerise lecture by Bert De Craene (VRT) (More information to follow)

  • Woe
    26
    Feb
    2020
    19:30Het Pand, Onderbergen 1

    Samuel Greene (King’s College London)

    Samuel Greene is reader in Russian politics and Director of the Russia Institute at King's College London. His research focuses on the relationships between citizens and the state in Russia, and in societies experiencing social, economic and political transformation more broadly. His first book, Moscow in Movement: Power and Opposition in Putin's Russia, was published by Stanford University Press in 2014. More recently, he is co-author with Graeme Robertson of Putin v the People: The Perilous Politics of a Divided Russia, published by Yale University Press in 2019. He also serves as Associate Fellow in the Russian and Eurasian Programme of the International Institute for Security Studies and a Visiting Professor at the UK Defence Academy.

    The idea of the authoritarian citizen presents a conundrum for students of politics. Classical descriptions of autocracies see citizens as demobilized and controlled, and thus largely written out of the political equation. Increasingly, however, research has elucidated the ways that authoritarian leaders rule with the masses, rather than despite them. The idea that the power of a leader such as Vladimir Putin is co-constructed – that it is produced and reproduced simultaneously and continuously by rulers and ruled – only gets us so far, however, leaving unanswered important questions about how people interpret and navigate the political and social trade-offs inherent to life in authoritarianism, and why some people dissent. This discussion will begin to re-open some of these questions from the bottom up, asking how and why Russian citizens come to understand power the way they do, and whether we need to revisit our own notions of authoritarian citizenship as a result.

     

  • Woe
    11
    Dec.
    2019
    19:30Academieraadzaal, Voldersstraat 9

    Koen Schoors, UGent

    Internationaal onderzoek wijst uit dat elites wereldwijd persistent zijn. Individuen uit historische elite-families hebben eeuwen later nog steeds een grotere kans om tot de maatschappelijke elite te behoren. Vaak wordt gedacht dat Rusland hierop een uitzondering vormt, omdat de maatschappelijke hiërarchie herhaaldelijk door elkaar werd geschud. Men denkt hierbij aan de Russische revolutie, de burgeroorlog tussen witten en roden, de collectivisatie van de landbouw, de zuiveringen door Stalin, de transitie van plan- naar markteconomie en de installatie van een verticale machtsstructuur onder Poetin. Desondanks blijkt dat ook in Rusland, ondanks de zware maatschappelijke schokken die het land moest ondergaan, maatschappelijke elites verrassend persistent zijn.

  • Woe
    20
    Nov.
    2019
    19:30Het Pand, Onderbergen 1

    H.E. Ambassador Vladimir Chizhov is Permanent Representative of the Russian Federation to the EU

    Throughout the years H.E. AmbassadorChizhov has worked both in Russia at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs as in countries abroad, including Greece, Cyprus and Austria. He was Deputy High Representative for the Bosnia Peace Implementation in Sarajevo, and Russian Special Representative for Cyprus and later the Balkans. In 2000 he was awarded the diplomatic rank of Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary. Before being appointed Ambassador to the EU in 2005, he was Russia’s Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs.

    H.E. Ambassador Chizhov conducted analytical research work on European security, OSCE, Russia-EU and Russia-NATO relations, Mediterranean, Balkans, problems of Cyprus and Northern Ireland and UN peace-keeping operations. He was decorated with several state awards.

    He will address the audience on EU-Russia relations.

    Registration is required via the online Event Manager before  November, 18.

  • Ma
    04
    Nov.
    2019
    09:00Het Pand, Onderbergen 1

    Third Ghent Russia colloquium hosted by the Russia Platform of Ghent University, with the support of the China Platform 

    'Russia and China in the 21st century: Between Cooperation and Competition at the Regional and Global level'

    There is broad recognition among scholars that the liberal world order that emerged in the post-Cold War era is under strain. While growing political polarization in Western societies is undermining the current world order from within, non-Western powers are increasingly challenging Western hegemony and are attempting to shape a new world order. The colloquium will focus on two of the main protagonists of this global transformation, namely Russia and China. In particular, the conference seeks to shed new light on how Russia and China (are seeking to) create a new international order. Importantly, Russia and China are also neighbours, with a contentious historical relationship, and in their mutual strive to create a non-western international order, they are not only partners but also competitors. Nowhere does this duality emerge more openly than in Central Asia, a region traditionally dominated by Russia but increasingly becoming under China’s sphere of influence. Moreover, Russia is itself witnessing the effects of China’s rise, as China is making several inroads into Russia. Indeed, as China further embarks on implementing its Belt and Road Initiative, it is slowly changing the face of Eurasia, including Russia.

    With the purpose of shedding further light on the role of Russia and China in these ongoing regional and global developments, we invited contributions from a wide array of disciplines, including political science, international relations, economy, law, anthropology and area studies.

    There are 4 parallel sessions during the day, with a keynote panel in the afternoon.

     

    Keynote speakers

    Timofei Bordachev is Associate Professor at the Faculty of World Economy and International Affairs, Higher School of Economics (Moscow), and Programme Director of the Valdai Discussion Club.

    Yang Cheng is Professor of International Relations and Assistant Dean of the School of International Relations and Public Affairs, Shanghai International Studies University.

    Meer informatie

  • Woe
    31
    Jan
    2018
    Do
    01
    Feb
    2018
    Tokyo

    GCSEES organized together with the Hokudai Slavic Research Center, Sapporo/Japan a joint Symposium on microliterary standard languages at Tokyo with the title 'Tokyo Symposium on Slavic Minorities and their (Literary) Languages in the European Context and Beyond: the Current Situation and Critical Challenges'.

     

    Programme

  • Vrij
    29
    Sep
    2017
    Zat
    30
    Sep
    2017
    Gent

    Accelerated development? Socio-political landslides, cultural ruptures and literary history in Eastern Europe

     

    In 1964 the Bulgarian-Belarusian-Russian scholar Georgii Gachev coined the term ‘uskorennoe razvitie’ or ‘accelerated development’ in his 1964 monograph Accelerated Development of Literature: On the Basis of the Bulgarian Literature of the First Half of the 19thCentury.  The term describes what happened to Bulgarian literature during Ottoman rule. Being a ‘young’ and ‘peripheral’ literature, having started to develop only recently at the time, Bulgarian literature ‘had to’ go through the whole evolution of European literature at a high pace in order to catch up with the latter. One of the side effects of this accelerated development was that characteristics of different style periods could even co-occur. Gachev’s thought-provoking idea has never really received a lot of attention, except in Bulgarian studies, where the concept was elaborated, criticized and / or gave way to new theories (Petar Dinekov, Nikolai Genchev, Roumen Daskalov, Alexander Kiossev …), but mostly with regard to the development of Bulgarian culture and society.

    Today Gachev’s theory seems outdated, not in the least for its centralist assumptions – i.e. taking for granted that central cultures take the lead and peripheral cultures follow suit – that form the very basis of the Eurocentric theory. Nonetheless, the potential of the very kernel of the concept is obvious – both for dealing with the literary histories of other ‘young’ and/or ‘peripheral’ literatures in different time periods and for challenging the different notions that form the basis of Gachev’s theory – ‘peripheral’, ‘young’, ‘Western’, ‘dominant’, ‘oppression’, ‘conservatism’. ‘Accelerated development’ may be a suitable term to describe how Western literary critics in the 19th century thought about the quickly evolving, ‘peripheral’ Russian literature of the time. ‘Accelerated development’ may also be applied to the evolution of (certain) Modernist movements in the ‘peripheral’ Eastern Europe. And what to say about the apparent fast-forward evolution of the East-European literatures after the collapse of Communism, quickly adapting Postmodernism, Magical Realism, and other literary trends that other, ‘central’ literatures had been going through earlier?

    This conference aims to explore – i.e., to corroborate, to challenge or to further develop – the concept of accelerated development by looking at concrete cases in the literary histories of Eastern Europe where one can speak of a major rupture, such as suddenly acquired cultural independence or freedom or technological evolution, that causes the literature to change course and, possibly, to ‘accelerate’. More specifically, this conference hopes to find new ways to look at the complex relationships between dominant and non- or less-dominant, central and peripheral, old and young literatures and cultures, colonizing and colonized cultures, progressive and conservative cultures, open and oppressive / repressive cultures, etc. Additionally, the conference aims to discuss the (catalytic) role of cultural agents in the process of accelerated development and the tension(s) between literary and extra-literary motivations. Lastly, the conference hopes to shed light on how cultures going through an accelerated development look at their earlier selves and whether, and if so, how accelerated developments may also lead to new, ‘own’ literary forms that are not quite related to the seemingly dominant cultures.

     

    Keynote speakers:Raymond Detrez (Belgium), Galin Tihanov (UK) and Willem G. Weststeijn (The Netherlands).

     

    Organizing Committee: Ben Dhooge, Phaedra Claeys, Michel De Dobbeleer, Miglena Dikova-Milanova, Tilde Geerardyn, Russian Literature and Culture Abroad (RuLCA, Ghent University)

    Scientific Committee: Nikolay Aretov (Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia), Pieter Boulogne (University of Leuven / Ghent University), Raymond Detrez (Ghent University / University of Leuven), Theo D’haen (University of Leuven), César Domínguez (University of Santiago de Compostela), Dennis Ioffe (Ghent University / University of Amsterdam), Alexander Kiossev (Sofia University), Ellen Rutten (University of Amsterdam), Ivana Živančević Sekeruš (University of Novi Sad)

    Conference Venue: Campus Boekentoren: Jozef Plateauzaal & zaal Simon Stevin, Jozef Plateaustraat 22, Ghent, Belgium 

     

    Programme

  • Vrij
    10
    Feb
    2017
    Zat
    11
    Feb
    2017
    Gent

    Platonov and the Revolution | Платонов и революция

    Particpants: Ben Dhooge (Ghent), Olga Frolova (Moscow), Hans Günther (Bielefeld), Leonid Heller (Paris, Lausanne), Robert Hodel (Hamburg), Konstantin Kaminskij (Berlin), Ilya Kukuy (München) and Yevgeny Yablokov (Moscow).

    Х. Гюнтер. Революция и тоска у Платонова
    О. Фролова. Диалог А. Платонова с языком его времени (на материале повести "Котлован")
    К. Каминский. От энергетической революции к энергетическому повороту – уроки Андрея Платонова
    Р. Ходел. Счастье и/или революция в "Котловане"
    Л. Геллер. Платонов: революция, утопия, насилие
    Е. Яблоков. Революционный пассеизм Андрея Платонова
    И. Кукуй. Неюбилейный Платонов: экранизация амбивалентности в фильме Ларисы Шепитько "Родина электричества"
    Б. Дооге. Платонов и "скифство".

     

    More information

  • Ma
    29
    Feb
    2016
    Din
    01
    Mar
    2016

    GCSEES took part in the Hokudai Days at the University of Ghent, contributing two panels to the event in collaboration with the Slavic-Eurasian Research Center (SERC), Hokkaido University, Sapporo.

     

    29 February 2016, Het Pand, Oude Infirmerie
    PANEL Borders and Margins in Eastern Europe (Faculty of Arts and Philosophy, Department of Languages and Cultures and Hokkaido University Slavic-Eurasian Research Center (SERC)

    14.00-14.45
    Go Koshino (HSRC), A Subverting Perception of Tuteishiya (Local People) in Contemporary Belarusian Literature
    14.45-15.30
    Motoki Nomachi (HSRC), Questions of the Gorani Ethnolect in the Context of the Disintegration of Serbo-Croatian
    15.30-16.15
    Rozita Dimova (GCSEES), Displacing Borders through Materiality and Aesthetics in Contemporary Macedonia
    16.15-17.00
    Dieter Stern (GCSEES), Informal Cross-Border Economies in the Post-Soviet Space as a Field of Linguistic Investigation

    1 March 2016, Blandijnberg, 6th floor
    STUDENT PANEL Gateways to Eastern Europe: Young researchers and their research
    10.00-10.45
    Genichi Ikuma (HSRC), Representations of Human Beings in Soviet Unofficial Art
    10.45-11.30
    Charlotte Bollaert (GCSEES, TRACE), Jean-Paul Sartre in Soviet-Russia: Early Responses and Image Formation

     

     

  • Vrij
    23
    Mei
    2014
    Zat
    24
    Mei
    2014

    GCSEES hosted the 10th meeting of paleoslavists (Altslavistentreffen), a (bi)annual meeting of an informal network of paleoslavists from Belgium, Germany, Italy and Bulgaria.

    Programme